Indigo30 DAY 28: The MYPaleo5

You’re about done with this thing, and I’m about to kick you out of your snuggly little nest with all the rest of your baby bird friends. What to do next? Do you really want to know what I think you should do from here on out? Do you want to know what I am going to do from here on out?

The MYPaleo5. That’s my name for how to roll the other 11 months of the year.

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MEDITATION • YOGA • PALEO

How to do the MYPaleo5:

  1. Do the Indigo30, which is the Whole30 nutritional reset, along with daily yoga every September.
  2. Genuinely complete the re-introduction, the Fast Track or the Slow Roll, to the best of your ability. Journal what you experience with each food group. Keep it for next year, so you can see what has changed after 11 months.
  3. When that is complete, adopt a Paleo diet (see Day 3 Blog Post, “Whole30 v. Paleo v. Keto” to review the parameters of a Paleo diet – I also love the website, Paleo on a Budget for really breaking down Paleo in super easy terms. (And she has a recipe for Paleo Maple Bacon Chocolate Chip Cookies, so… yeah.) Go for 80-90% of the time or at least 5 days a week, allowing for leniency and margin during social events, holidays and special occasions.
  4. Have a willpower plan. Maintain and nurture your small group.
  5. Meditate and do a mindfulness practice at least 5 days a week. This can range from 5-10 minutes when you wake up (literally, wake up 15 minutes earlier, use the bathroom, and sit your butt on your cushion) to gratitudes with your loved ones to attending all the many daily meditation classes we offer at Indigo Yoga. Friends, this practice is EQUALLY AS IMPORTANT IF NOT MORE THAN YOUR DIET AND EXERCISE. THIS IS YOUR STATE OF MIND. DO NOT SKIP THIS PART.
  6. Commit to in-studio yoga 5 days a week. The other 2 days you can do other workouts or rest. Doing anything less than 5 will — for you, after having been on your mat every day — weaken your cue, routine and ritual strength, which means you won’t feel the same rewards as you do now (strength, stamina, discipline, empowerment, pride … even just for showing up …) You don’t want to weaken your momentum.
  7. Anytime you feel like you are getting too lose with your “margin,” commit to 5 days of disciplined Whole30 and yoga and reset. I am certain any of your Indigo30 2018 comrades would join you if you need the support!

In the meantime, here is a basic overview of a Paleo diet. As you will see there are things on here that are going to shock you and make you jump for joy! And… all in moderation. Like all things. All the time, everywhere… remember little grasshoppers … The Middle Way.

What you CAN HAVE:

• Meat – bacon too, of course, always bacon!
• Fish
• Vegetables
• Fruit
• Nuts
• Seeds

• Dairy
• White Rice
• White Potato
• Natural Sweeteners such as: raw honey, maple syrup, coconut nectar
• Dark chocolate — WHAT!! YES!! IT’S TRUE!

What Paleo suggests NOT eating
• Grains / Wheat / Gluten / Corn
• Soy
• Legumes
• Sugar (like high-fructose corn syrup, table sugar, etc)
• Overly processed foods

image.pngThere is loads and loads and LOADS of information on the internet and a gazillion books on Paleo living, so you are certainly not short of resources. My favorites are hands down Paleo Magazine and the Well Fed Magazine. My two favorite books are Practical Paleo and Paleo Comfort Foods. I know I haven’t even scratched the surface!

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Bonus! Here are some of the most popular Paleo recipes as an early triumph treat!

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Bonus #2, and if I didn’t love you, I wouldn’t share this with you because I’m a little covetous of it! But I love you.

Paleo Chocolate Chip Cookies

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Brooke’s favorite Paleo recipe OF. ALL. TIME. This pic here? Actual footage of the last batch I made…
Cook Time 10 minutes
Total Time 10 minutes
Servings 15 cookies
Calories 253 kcal
Author Rachel Conners

Ingredients

  • ½ cup coconut oil room temperature
  • ¾ cup coconut sugar
  • 1 egg room temperature (can also use a flax egg to keep it vegan – 1 tablespoon flax meal + 2.5 tablespoons water, whisk together and let set for 10 minutes before using)
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • cups (9 oz.) blanched almond flour
  • 1 cup (6 oz.) chopped dark chocolate see notes
  • Flaky sea salt to sprinkle on top (optional)

Instructions

  1. Beat together the coconut oil and coconut sugar until smooth. Add the egg and vanilla and mix until smooth.
  2. Add the almond flour, salt, and baking soda to the wet ingredients. Mix until well incorporated. Fold in the chopped chocolate. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least an hour (can prepare up to 48 hours ahead of time).
  3. When you’re ready to bake, preheat the oven to 350ºF. Use a cookie scoop to form cookies and place on a parchment lined baking sheet; press down slightly. Sprinkle with flaky sea salt if desired. Bake for 10 minutes or just beginning to turn golden brown around the edges.

Recipe Notes

To keep completely paleo, make your own chocolate or use Santa Barbara Chocolate’s Coconut Sugar Sweetened Dark Chocolate (code BAKERITA will get you $10 off).

Have a great day 28!

Keep going!
B

Indigo30 DAY 3: Whole30 v. Paleo v. Keto

So many diets, so little time.

Welcome to Day 3. You’ve triumphed through two days of no sugar, no alcohol, no beans, no grains and no dairy. BRAVO! Give yourself lots of back pats today, my friends. You have trekked up the mountain a good distance; basecamp is just barely in sight.

All the literature about the Whole30 says this is one of the toughest days. And we’ve been talking quite a good bit about what is going to be difficult so far, to prepare you. So instead of continuing to shine a light on what’s hard, let’s divert our attention to something that is of interest to many of you: the difference between Whole30, Paleo and Keto. But before I dive into the battle of the diets, I want to give you just a little bit of Indigo30 motherly love. Today you may feel pretty rough. So if you can, go easy on yourself. If a nap is anywhere possible for you, take one. When you get on your mat, downshift a gear, take a few extra child’s poses. If there’s a chance at a longer savasana or as we call it at Indigo, “extended rest,” then seize the rest. Your body is detoxing, quite literally. It is starting to heal from the damage done by your old less-healthy food choices and perhaps an inconsistent yoga practice. Acne, rashes, fatigue, digestive distress, mood swings — all normal. Not fun, but normal. You may even feel like you are coming down with something. Again, normal. But, don’t reach for the saltines; drink some club soda or sparkling water, lie down for a bit, have some bone broth to comfort or some peppermint tea to soothe. It’s all going to be okay, pumpkin!

So now let’s learn something today. I want you fully and excitedly equipped with useful information from this program.

A popular question of late is, “What is the difference between Whole30, Paleo and Keto?” All three approaches have gained worldwide momentum, and it’s a great topic to break down so that you know which works best for you. Obviously you are choosing Whole30 now, but knowing about Paleo and Keto for later may suit you in a lovely way for the long term. All have distinct similarities, most notably that they are low-carbohydrate approaches to nutrition. Keto is structured to be extremely low-carb. Paleo and Whole30 are just naturally low-carb because they eliminate all processed food, grains, and refined sugars, which are naturally carbohydrate-dense. All three approaches encourage a move toward clean, whole food eating and educate followers on the importance of knowing where their food came from and what is in it.

The best way to understand each is to examine what you can or cannot eat and some of their specific nuances.

PALEO

The Paleo diet focuses on eating whole, healthy, natural foods, avoiding (but not necessarily eliminating forever) inflammatory and processed foods. Paleo takes out foods like breads, flour, rice, corn, other grains, legumes (including soy and peanuts) and dairy. This approach is particularly good long-term for people who have gluten sensitivities, celiac, and/or wheat and nut allergies. Refined sugars are also eliminated on the Paleo diet, but many recipes use maple syrup, honey or stevia to sweeten. Alcohol, although obviously not encouraged in quantity or consistency, is not off limits.

Paleo is notorious for having amazing recipes with all-natural, compliant ingredients that mimic typically “unhealthy” food; you’ve probably all heard about the infamous Paleo Banana Pancakes, or the muffins, or my personal favorite, the Paleo Chocolate Chip Cookies (sorry, I know that’s painful to read right now.) Because of the flexibility and modifications Paleo offers, many find it to be the most suitable approach long-term.

WHOLE30

The Whole30, first and foremost, is a 30-day elimination challenge, or reset. It is not a diet and it is not meant to be done nor is it really even realistic to do long-term. The Whole30 eliminates sugar, alcohol, grains, dairy and legumes. At the end of 30 days, a “reintroduction” allows you to determine which of the 5 groups mentioned above cause you sensitivities. The Whole30 takes Paleo a step beyond by not allowing any kind of “SWYPO” (you can to read the Whole30 book to find out what that acronym means) or imitation/modified versions of junk foods, baked goods and treats. The Whole30 (and Paleo) do not restrict food intake, or track/count macros, calories or carbs. It discourages the use of the scale and encourages the acknowledgement of “non-scale-victories,” or NSVs.

The Whole30 is most certainly restrictive and “all-in,” which is a really great approach for those who are wanting and willing to drastically clean house and pinpoint food reactions and intolerances. It’s motivating, it teaches followers to think differently about food, it has a remarkable global community and is an overall great reset.

(Can you tell I’m partial?)

KETO

The Ketogenic Diet, or “Keto” diet, can be considered the strictest of the three options. It is a strict low-carb, high-fat (let me be clear — high “good fat”) approach to dieting and most specifically, weight loss. The goal of the diet is to achieve, by way of diet, a state called nutritional ketosis. In ketosis, your body shifts from burning carbohydrates for energy to burning from fat reserves (simply because there aren’t enough carbohydrates to fuel your metabolism.) It requires significant carb restriction and a significant increase in fat consumption. Many low-carb diets are high-protein and low fat, but Keto is high-fat and moderate-protein. img_0019

One specific differentiator between Keto and Whole30/Paleo is the tracking of macros (daily intake of carbs, fat and protein) or following a detailed meal plan to keep your carb count in the 20-50 grams per day range. Some keto dieters also test their levels of ketones with urine strips. Keto can help people become very aware of how many carbohydrates they are consuming, but because of the restrictiveness and the diligence of macro tracking, it can be difficult to maintain long-term.

In Conclusion

Now you know the difference. In a nutshell, one is a reset (W30), one is long-term (Paleo), and one is primarily for weight loss (Keto), although it has a lot of other great benefits too; however, it is neither a reset nor an easy long-term approach given it’s strict and restrictive nature.

And — you may find something really useful and helpful in all three approaches, perhaps using each of them at different times of the year depending on your needs and desires. I know many people who adopt a little or a lot from all three for custom blend that works great for their needs and lifestyle. Often I hear, “I’m about 80% Whole30 about 80% of the time. The rest of the time I’m more Paleo. And like 2% of the time, I have a cupcake. And I love it.”

I love that approach. Even though the math doesn’t actually work, I still love it.

The great news about all three is that they encourage us to eat unprocessed, whole, natural foods, educate ourselves about that food and inquire with ourselves on our relationship with it. Great news indeed.

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Brooke’s Besties!

RECIPE: My infamous “Tajin Almonds”

I was taught this recipe from a dear friend who lives in Monterrey, Mexico. Her housekeeper made these for us when visited a few years ago. She gave me a handful and said, “Try these, you are going to die.” And I did. I’ve shared them with every Indigo30 group since then, and they have become a signature snack and best kept Indigo30 secret!

Ingredients:

Raw Almonds, Orange Juice, Lemon Juice, Kosher Salt, Tajin Seasoning (available anywhere)

Directions:

Heat oven to 350 degrees and line a baking sheet with non-stick tin foil. I always get a big bag of raw almonds at Costco (best price, great quality). Dump them all in a big bowl and pour orange juice over until they are barely submerged. Then add some lemon juice (I don’t have exact quantities, the housekeeper just told me, in Spanish, what was in them, I watched as she made, and I have since guessed!) Let the almonds soak for about 3 minutes. Don’t soak any longer or they will get too soggy. Drain the juice by straining. Return almonds to the bowl and thoroughly coat with kosher salt and Tajin. Stir up really well. Line the baking sheet and bake for 4 minutes. After 4 minutes, gently turn over/around the almonds (add more seasoning now if you want!) Return them to the oven and bake for another 5 minutes. Let them cool. As they cool, they will get crispy again. Best stored in glass jars. ENJOY!

And, keep going.

B